Best Landmark in Fulham London, UK

Handpicked Top 3 Landmarks in Fulham London. Our 50-Point Inspection includes everything from checking reputation, history, complaints, local reviews, satisfaction, trust and cost to the general excellence. You deserve only the best!

FULHAM TOWN HALL

553-561 Fulham Rod, Fulham London SW6 1EU

Since 1890

City Hall or Town Hall, Landmarks, Architecture Structure, Historical Places, Heritage Site, Historic Scenes, Programs & Events

It is a Grade II listed building designed by George Edwards - It was constructed of Portland stone in a classical style

lbhf.gov.uk/councillors-and-demo...

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The stained glass window at the head of the stairs leading to the great hall was made by the firm of Lowndes and Drury at the Glass House, the stained glass studio in Lettice Street. The elite of Fulham lolled lazily in sofa stalls beneath the shade of sheltering palms.
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FULHAM FIRE STATION

685 Fulham Road, Fulham London SW6 5UJ

Since 1896

Landmarks, Architecture Structure, Historical Places, Heritage Site, Watchtower & Fire station

It is a Grade II listed building - It was built by the chief architect was Robert Pearsall

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The four-storey station stands detached and its prominence in the streetscape is enhanced by the gabled façade, corner turrets and tall chimneys. The façade is symmetrical with two appliance bays in an advancing central section with a lead crested pyramidal roof and gabled dormers breaking through the corbelled eaves. The appliance bays, with replaced timber doors, have rubbed brick segmental arched openings with tiled spandrels, and are flanked by buttresses with stone pinnacles
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FULHAM HOUSE

87 Fulham High Street, Fulham London SW6 3JS

Since 1902

Landmarks, Architecture Structure, Historical Places, Heritage Site, Programs & Events

It is a Grade II listed house - The Committee room is ideal for boardroom meetings and can accommodate up to 30 delegates

alternativevenues.co.uk/venues/f...

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The current building was built in the early 18th century, but the cellars are probably earlier. It was originally called Passors, based on a family living on the site during the reign of Edward III. A passor or passator was a ferryman. A later occupant was the wool merchant Ralph Warren, who was Lord Mayor of London in 1536.
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